CINEMA

METAL LORDS (2022)

Movie Review

MPAA: R
Release Date: 04/08/22
Genre: Comedy/Drama/Music

Studio: Netflix

THE "IMDB" PREMISE:

"Two friends try to form a heavy metal band with a cellist for a Battle of the Bands."

OUR MOVIE REVIEW:

Metal Lords is an R-rated teenage coming of age story that tugs on your heartstrings and wants nothing more than for you to rock to what they're putting out. With instances resembling the 2003 film School of Rock – some may consider this a modern spiritual sequel to where Jack Black’s Dewey left off. However Metal Lords is simply not School of Rock – mainly because it suffers from a severe lack of Jack Black. In my eyes, Metal Lords should not be even rivaled against the rocking School of Rock and instead be treated as purely its own thing.

 

Metal Lords tackles not only heavy metal but the influence bullies have on an individual and the trial of fitting in. The film isn’t saying that starting a band will instantly make anyone have a lifelong connection with others but it is speaking out about giving one’s all towards something they love and being able to accept change – good or bad.

 

Metal Lords is led by the struggling friendship between rough around the edges Hunter (Adrian Greensmith) and his best friend, Kevin (Jaeden Martell). Having lost his mother in recent years, Hunter is struggling with fitting in and decides that heavy metal is the one and only way to solve all his troubles. Originally a fight against the bullies evolves into Hunter becoming the thing he hates when he starts to realize that his obsession with creating a rock band is destroying his friendship.

 

Sitting at 97 minutes, this teenage dramatic comedy might not always nail the pacing and the involvement of our third lead, Emily (Isis Hainsworth) takes some time to fully develop beyond a possible love interest, but it’s a mosh pit of emotion worth experiencing. For viewers that really appreciate the art of rock ‘n roll and heavy metal may be able to obtain even more out of this love letter toward the subject matter; but in actuality it's aimed toward maturing teens looking for a better way to express themselves.

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OUR VERDICT: