NEW REVIEWS

TO YOU BY:

BROUGHT 

CINEMA

Knowing as little as I do about WWE or wrestling in general, I was left extremely polarized by just how much I enjoyed Fighting with My Family. This film was a realistic and not afraid to pull punches British family drama with a twisted sense of humor about a woman fighting for her dream, even if it conflicts with her brother’s.

OPENING THOUGHTS:

DIRECTION:

Stephen Merchant, co-creator of The Office (BBC Original), directed and wrote the film, and while it may not contain the constant cringe style of comedy that his other shows may focus on, his direction is unlike anything I’d have thought Merchant was capable of. The huge arena set pieces are stunning, and the long road there is an energetic journey to watch Paige triumph through. While I’m not a huge boxing fan after watching Rocky or the newly released Creed series, I feel thrilled to have seen a fight commence before my eyes, however the wrestling shown in Fighting with My Family is far from thrilling and just like the sport itself felt enticingly fixed to the point of exhaustion. The direction is relatively straight forward, and similar to something out of a Rocky film, but based on a real person and placed in the world of wrestling instead of boxing. It’s a subject matter that isn’t usually done so well, and that’s what makes Fighting with My Family stand out on its own amongst the rest. Maybe the fight scenes, or partially the training montages, bring the appropriate umph the film needed, but the rest of the film makes up for it with Merchant’s excellent representation of the characters and delivering on the human aspect of these real life icons.

PLOT:

What the film does suffer from is pacing problems; there’s a sluggish overall feeling that washes over you as you watch Paige develop into the woman she truly is. Her training scenes occasionally feel misguided and wrongly executed, but even when moments like this occur, the performances in the scenes prosper to make the scene successful enough to push forward. Beyond the fights, the dramatic and comedic elements of the film connected beautifully together, like pieces of a puzzle. The writing is swift, at times wicked, and other times touching. Merchant has successfully examined Saraya Knight’s career and family life to a tea, displaying them charismatically onto the big screen for all of us to see.

ACTING | CHARACTERS | DIALOGUE:

The acting in Fighting with My Family is absolutely wonderful, and everybody involved gives a worthwhile performance. There’s a few standouts along the way, including our lead Florence Pugh. Pugh gives a stimulating performance as a young woman who believes that her dream is only reachable by conforming to the standards people have already set out for her. She propels with confidence on the surface, concealing her real emotions until behind locked doors so no one can see who she really is. Along the way, Pugh’s Paige is joined by her family, whom includes Nick Frost, Lena Headey, and Jack Lowden, along with her newly appointed trainer Hutch played by Vince Vaughn, and a supportive character from time to time, Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson as himself. Every actor is tremendous in their roles, whether it be their prior experience with the subject matter, or just being a damn good actor, everyone is ultimately believable in their role.

VISUAL EFFECTS | MAKEUP | DESIGN:

MUSIC | SCORE | SOUND DESIGN:

Merchant immerses the audience in the world of Paige from the constant banter at the hometown ring to the sold out WWE arena; the film makes the audience participate in the action through the audio. Heart-pounding, hilarious, and saddening, the audio captures all the elements that lead to brilliant filmmaking; the only issue in the sound department is the choice of lyrical music during a training montage. The  overused, unoriginal song choices felt like they were pulled from an old fashioned training sequence. From completely immersing us with the atmosphere to throw it all away in a quick second for a routine montage song is disappointing, however not enough to warrant a downgrade in rating. Especially when the fairly new composer, known for his work on the short run series Hello Ladies starring Stephen Merchant, composes a score that captures all the proper emotions to capitalize in the moment taking place on screen.

CLOSING THOUGHTS:

Merchant immerses the audience in the world of Paige from the constant banter at the hometown ring to the sold out WWE arena; the film makes the audience participate in the action through the audio. Heart-pounding, hilarious, and saddening, the audio captures all the elements that lead to brilliant filmmaking; the only issue in the sound department is the choice of lyrical music during a training montage. The  overused, unoriginal song choices felt like they were pulled from an old fashioned training sequence. From completely immersing us with the atmosphere to throw it all away in a quick second for a routine montage song is disappointing, however not enough to warrant a downgrade in rating. Especially when the fairly new composer, known for his work on the short run series Hello Ladies starring Stephen Merchant, composes a score that captures all the proper emotions to capitalize in the moment taking place on screen.

I left Fighting with My Family with a full heart and feeling emotionally raw from the love transpiring on screen after this 128 minute runtime. While I didn’t leave wanting to learn more about the infinite world of wrestling, I am glad to have seen a woman following her dreams and making a name for herself in an age where women wrestlers were used more for eye candy than for the sport itself. The film shows that you should be able to be yourself and work hard toward what your passionate about, hoping to make your dream come true in the process. Merchant excels with his second feature film; even though it certainly has its flaws, the message is prominently clear.

CONCLUSIVE VERDICT:

x0

x3

x2

=

"Dick Me Dead, And Bury Me Pregnant."

  • Connor Petrey
  • crpWritescom
  • crpwritescom
  • crpWritescom

Movie Review

CASUAL

Written By Connor Petrey

Published: 03.07.19

MPAA: PG13

Ediited By McKayla Hockett

Support Us

Release: 02.22.19

Genre: Biography. Comedy. Drama.

crpWrites Patreon
SUPPORT OUR PATREON
tip-jar-1.png
crpWrites.com

All Rights Reserved. © 2018-2019  crpWrites.com

 follow us on social media 
  • crpWrites
  • crpWritescom
  • crpwritescom
  • Patreon